ISMIE’s 2023 Virtual
Risk Management Symposium


When & where

November 7-9, 2023 11:30 a.m. - 2:15 p.m. CT

Virtual

Attend the premier patient safety and risk management conference

We are excited to announce that ISMIE’s annual Risk Management Symposium will spotlight six extraordinary speakers offering thought-provoking insights and actionable guidance on patient safety and risk management.

The event will be held online over three days, featuring topics such as opioids, the future of primary care, patient safety and more!

2023 Speakers & Sessions

Shantanu Nundy, MD

Shantanu Nundy, MD

Finding a Way Forward: Reinventing Healthcare After COVID-19

Shantanu Nundy, MD

Shantanu Nundy, MD, is a practicing primary care physician at Neighborhood Health, a federally qualified health center serving a large immigrant community in Northern Virginia. Dr. Nundy has published a variety of thought leadership contributions in healthcare including “Employers Can Do More to Advance Health Equity” in the Harvard Business Review, “The Quintuple Aim for Health Care Improvement: A New Imperative to Advance Health Equity” in the Journal of American Medicine, and has authored or been cited in Washington Post, The New York Times, NPR, and Wall Street Journal. In 2021 he published a second book, Care After Covid: What the Pandemic Revealed is Broken in Healthcare and How to Reinvent It.

Finding a Way Forward: Reinventing Healthcare After COVID-19

Practices have not fully leveraged virtual care, home care and technologies that were accelerated during COVID-19 to create new care models and improve equity and outcomes. This session will give participants a new framework (distributed, digitally enabled, and decentralized) for healthcare innovation and improvement. Join us to learn how the elements that make up this framework were catalyzed by COVID-19 and how they stand to help advance health equity and improve patient outcomes in the future.

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Paul O’Rourke, MD, MPH, FACP

Paul O’Rourke, MD, MPH, FACP

Primary Care and the U.S. Health System: A Critical Foundation in Need of Support

Paul O’Rourke, MD, MPH, FACP

Paul O’Rourke, MD, MPH, FACP, is an assistant professor in the Department of Medicine at the Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine. He completed his undergraduate and medical school education at the University of Florida, followed by residency training in Internal Medicine at the University of Pennsylvania Health System. He then completed a fellowship in General Internal Medicine at Johns Hopkins University with a focus on medical education. He received a Master of Public Health degree from the Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health.

Primary Care and the U.S. Health System: A Critical Foundation in Need of Support

Primary healthcare is often described as the foundation of effective health systems and is considered to have four distinctive features: person-centeredness, comprehensiveness, continuity of care, and a regular and trusted physician or clinician. In this session, Dr. O’Rourke will explore the evidence of how primary care influences population health, as well as the financial well-being of patients and the health system. He will discuss the current state of the United States primary care health system and review contemporary projections. Finally, Dr. O’Rourke will explore potential mechanisms to enhance and support the primary care workforce in the United States.

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David E. Newman-Toker, MD, PhD

David E. Newman-Toker, MD, PhD

The Next Frontier for Patient Safety: What Will it Take to Achieve Diagnostic Excellence?

David E. Newman-Toker, MD, PhD

David E. Newman-Toker, MD, PhD, is an internationally recognized leader in the Improving Diagnosis movement. He is Professor of Neurology and Director of the Armstrong Institute Center for Diagnostic Excellence at the Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine. Dr. Newman-Toker has held multiple NIH, AHRQ, and foundation grants. He has published over 150 journal articles and given more than 300 invited lectures. He served as President of the Society to Improve Diagnosis in Medicine (2018-2020).

The Next Frontier for Patient Safety: What Will it Take to Achieve Diagnostic Excellence?

Diagnostic errors occur with all diseases and in all clinical settings, but a public health and patient-centered approach dictates that we focus on diagnostic errors most likely to result in harm to patients. In the ED, it is likely that just 10 diseases account for half of all serious misdiagnosis-related harms, and stroke is likely the leading cause. There are no “magic bullet” solutions, but we believe that a multi-pronged, disease-specific approach has the potential to transform diagnostic care processes and improve diagnostic outcomes for patients. This session will describe our real-world experience with the “four T” strategy (teamwork, training, technology and tuning), using the case study of missed stroke in acute dizziness.

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Gita Pensa, MD

Gita Pensa, MD

Doctors and Litigation: Defendant Support and Coaching for Doctors in Distress

Laura Kubzansky, PhD, MPH

Gita Pensa, MD, is an Adjunct Associate Professor of Emergency Medicine at Brown University and physician at Brown University Health and Wellness. She speaks nationally on the topic of malpractice litigation and litigation stress and is the creator of the open access podcast curriculum “Doctors and Litigation: The L Word,” an introduction to the practical and psychological preparation necessary for malpractice litigation defendants. She is also a well-being coach for defendants in litigation and a consultant to medical malpractice insurers and defense attorneys.

Doctors and Litigation: Defendant Support and Coaching for Doctors in Distress

Many doctors are completely unprepared for malpractice litigation, even though the majority will experience it during their careers. The experience is shrouded in secrecy and shame, and the individual physician often suffers in isolation, sometimes with disastrous consequences. Gita Pensa, MD, will discuss the complexities of litigation stress in doctors, its impact beyond legal outcomes, and how more effective support strategies for defendants can mitigate its impact.

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Daniel Ciccarone, MD, MPH

Daniel Ciccarone, MD, MPH

Beyond the Fourth Wave: An Update on Fentanyl Uses and Consequences

Daniel Ciccarone, MD, MPH

Daniel Ciccarone, MD, MPH, is the Justine Miner Professor in Addiction Medicine, in the Department of Family and Community Medicine, at University of California San Francisco. He has been principal or co-investigator on numerous NIH sponsored public health research projects including his current Synthetics in Combination (SYNC) study. He is a recognized international scholar on the medical, public health and public policy dimensions of substance use, risk and consequences. He is Associate Editor for the International Journal of Drug Policy (IJDP) and recently edited an IJDP special issue on the “triple wave crisis” of opioids, heroin and fentanyl in the United States. He consults for numerous private and public entities including the Office of National Drug Control Policy, CDC and FDA.

Beyond the Fourth Wave: An Update on Fentanyl Uses and Consequences

In this talk, Dr. Ciccarone will describe the four waves of overdose mortality due to prescription opioids, heroin, fentanyl and fentanyl-related polysubstance use. He will also examine recent trends including smoking fentanyl, counterfeit pills containing fentanyl and the combination use of fentanyl plus xylazine. In addition, clinical issues, harm reduction measures and public policies relating to the opioid epidemic will be discussed.

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Elizabeth Harry, MD

Elizabeth Harry, MD

Managing Cognitive Load for Improved Well-being: A Practical Approach to Address Burnout in Healthcare

Elizabeth Harry, MD

Elizabeth Harry, MD, is the Senior Medical Director of Well-being for UCHealth, Assistant Dean of Faculty Well-being for the University of Colorado School of Medicine, and Associate Professor of Medicine at the University of Colorado Hospital School of Medicine in the Division of General Internal Medicine. She has practiced internal medicine for over 10 years, in both inpatient and outpatient settings. In addition to the University of Colorado, Dr. Harry practiced at Brigham and Women’s Hospital for four years where she was the Assistant Medical Director: Director of Faculty Development and Well-being for the Brigham and Women’s Physicians Organization as well as the faculty liaison for graduate medical education well-being for Partners Healthcare GME programs. Additionally, she has three children, ages five, eight and ten, and her husband is a clinical pathologist at the University of Colorado Hospital.

Managing Cognitive Load for Improved Well-being: A Practical Approach to Address Burnout in Healthcare

The increased stress and demands on healthcare professionals in recent years has resulted in cognitive overload. Now more than ever, physicians are in need of practical strategies to manage their mental load to help enhance patient safety. Join Dr. Elizabeth Harry as she explores the factors contributing to cognitive load and their impact on errors. Attendees will learn actionable techniques to reduce mental burden, including employing effective information management, using cognitive aids and minimizing distractions. In addition, Dr. Harry will provide learners with strategies for developing an implementation-heavy plan to create a culture of reduced cognitive load and improved patient safety as a way to help transform their practice and improve outcomes.

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Who should attend

ISMIE’s Risk Management Symposium offers valuable insights for physicians, clinicians and risk managers alike. Attendees are encouraged to attend as many sessions as they’d like over the three days, allowing them to tailor the program to their specific needs.

Here’s what past attendees said:

  • Overall, excellent Symposium and good takeaways to put to use.

  • Loved how it kept the patient relationship personal.

  • As every year, the seminar offers something new. This year I will implement practices to help prevent burnout and address psychological factors in assessing cardiac conditions.

  • Thank you again for organizing this meaningful and relevant Symposium. “Even tomorrow is the future.” All six sessions will help us to fulfill our medical “mission.”

  • It was a great virtual meeting! Excellent speakers and excellent topics. Thanks.

  • Learning is a continuous process. Practice of medicine has changed a lot in the last 35 years!